Cyber Liability Insurance, Should you?

Have you asked yourself if you may need Cyber liability insurance?

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Take our quick cyber risk assessment.

  1. Does your company allow employees to remotely access your company network with mobile devices such as laptops, smartphones, tablets, etc.?
  2. Has your company hired vendors that have access to the information for which you are responsible or legally obligated to protect?
  3. Do your company’s service providers or contractors have on-site or remote access to your network?
  4. Has your company completed an inventory of all IT equipment and applications, and assigned a person to be responsible for maintaining these systems (anti-virus upgrades, software patches, strong passwords, etc.)?
  5. Has your company inventoried and classified the types of information it collects, processes, maintains or transmits, and do you restrict access to sensitive data, such as financial, medical or other personally identifiable information (PII)?
  6. Do any regulatory standards such as HITECH, HIPAA, or PCI DSS, apply to your company?
  7. Does your company have a protocol or individual identified to check network monitoring and logging devices?
  8. Is all sensitive information your company would collect, process, maintain or transmit encrypted?
  9. Does your company isolate customer information databases and payment/point-of-sale systems from other, less secure systems?
  10. Does your company have a process in place to ensure all antivirus protection, software updates/patches and equipment security settings are properly installed in a timely manner?
  11. Do contracts with all third-party service providers and contractors clearly specify their responsibility to safeguard sensitive information, while limiting their access to and use of this sensitive information commensurate with assigned tasks?

If you answered NO or NOT SURE to any of these questions then the answer to your original question is YES you do need Cyber Liability Insurance Coverage

C.L. Hollis Insurance has been helping people with their Risk Management for over 26 years. Let us answer your question. Contact us today!

Rick Hollis

Stoughton office 781.344.8578 – Wareham office 508.295.9500

www.insurehollis.com

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Classic Trucks, SUVs and Jeeps http://insurehollis.com/antique-vehicles-insurance/

classic Trucks

At C.L. Hollis Insurance we love your classics almost as much as you do! Offering unbeatable pricing with great coverage options. Specializing with programs tailored to you and yours.

Your love for your trucks and SUVs only grows over time. And if it’s a classic, so does its value. It’s up to you to protect that pride and joy. It’s never been easier, with custom coverage designed –and priced– for these treasured classics. To qualify for our program, trucks and utility vehicles must meet the following requirements:

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Stock

  • 1989 and older
  • Minimum value for 1972 and older is $3,500
  • Minimum value for 1973-1989 is $5,000
  • Vehicles cannot be used for camping
  • Vehicles should not be used regularly for towing and hauling; however, we can consider limited towing and hauling up to 20 times per year.

77-ford-bronco

Modified

  • 1995 and older
  • Minimum value for 1972 and older is $3,500
  • Minimum value for 1973-1989 is $5,000
  • Minimum value for 1990-1995 is $7,500
  • Extreme off-road modifications such as brush guards, roll bars, tool boxes and lift kits with large off-road tires will not be accepted
  • Vehicles cannot be used for camping
  • Vehicles should not be used regularly for towing and hauling; however, we can consider limited towing and hauling up to 20 times per year.

C.L. Hollis Insurance has been helping families like yours for over 26 years.

Call Stoughton 781-344-8578 Wareham 508-295-9500

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TOP 10 HOTTEST COLLECTOR CARS OF THE SUMMER

C.L. Hollis together with our trusted partner has been helping collector car and truck enthusiasts insure for over 28 years. http://insurehollis.com/antique-vehicles-insurance/

2000 Plymouth Prowler Photo Credit Teddy Pierper (c) 2015 Auctions America

As the summer driving season begins, Hagerty® announces the ten collector vehicles with the highest levels of demand and momentum. This list includes vehicles with positive value growth and momentum in private sales transactions, quote activity and auction results.

“The major trend continues to be the clear emergence of ‘Modern Classics’ from the 1980s and newer with new interest from younger buyers,” said McKeel Hagerty, CEO of Hagerty. “Our data allows us to measure the popularity of collector vehicles not just by value trends but by leading indicators like quote activity, private sales and other factors.”

1. 1986–1989 Mercedes-Benz 560SL (1987 560SLs start at $46,300) – Many buyers remember the 560SL as an aspirational car that signaled early career success for their original owners, and the average sale price in the private market is up 22% over the last 12 months.

2. 1973–1986 Jeep CJ-7 (1983 Jeep CJ-7 Laredos start at $12,900) – Jeep and off-roading have long been an American fascination and the CJ-7 remains very popular in 4×4 clubs. The special edition packages such as the “Limited” and “Jamboree Edition” are seeing the most interest, but any flavor can deliver open-air summer fun. Quoting activity has been particularly strong, with an increase of 120% over the past 12 months, indicating rising demand among enthusiasts.

3. 1973–1987 Chevrolet C/K Series Pickup (1973 C10s start at $12,200) – Pickups have been one of the fastest growing segments for the past five years. This is the first time this generation of Chevrolet pickup has outpaced the highly-sought-after 1967–1972 models. Ratings for this era of are being driven via the private sector, with a 9.5% increase in the number offered privately, an 11% rise in average sale price, and more than 38% of the cars selling privately doing so for amounts above their insured values.

4. 1986–1992 BMW M3 (1990 M3s start at $76,100) – To many, the E30 M3 is the purest sports car from the 1980s. If this is a car you’ve always wanted you probably shouldn’t wait much longer as values are only going one direction. Up. Values published in Hagerty Price Guide have increased 86% over the last 8 months.

5. 1982–1991 Porsche 944 (1988 Porsche 944s start at $15,600) – Whether younger buyers are priced out of the 911 market or just looking for something different than the norm, the 944 has recently gained a renewed following. Expect to see many nice low-mile examples come to market in the near future, with pristine Turbos selling for surprising amounts. Hagerty Price Guide values have increased 8% in value over the last 8 months.

6. 1997–2002 Plymouth/Chrysler Prowler (2000 Plymouth Prowlers start at $32,000) – Once described as a car better to be photographed next to, there is no denying the standout looks of one of the first modern retro cars. Prowlers have been one of the hottest cars at auction over the last 12 months, with a 9% increase in the number offered, a 6% increase in average sale price, and a strong sell-through rate of 72% over the last 12 months.

1966 Ford Bronco Convertible Photo Credit Copyright 2014

7. 1966–1977 Ford Bronco (1966 Ford Broncos start at $24,800) – Today’s SUV-dominated car culture continues to love the simple utilitarian look of the first generation Bronco. Coupled with excellent reliability and parts availability, the Bronco makes for an excellent first-time collector vehicle. Activity in the private market has been particularly strong for these stylish SUVs.

8. 1994–1999 Ferrari F355 (1997 F355 Spiders start at $68,900) – A true performance car with a fantastic engine sound and great looks. F355 price gains have lagged other Ferrari models over the past five years, which has suddenly made them relative bargains. Hagerty Price Guide values have increased 39% over the last 12 months. The cost of ownership on these cars can be high, though. So make sure to scrutinize service records.

9. 1970–1974 Dodge Challenger (1970 Challengers start at $36,200) – Early ’70s Mopar muscle cars have had the biggest swings in values going back to 2006. After being impacted by the recession they have recovered nicely, and Dodge fans are back to searching out as many “1 of 1” variations as they can find. Challengers have been performing very well at recent auctions, with cars offered up 17% and average sale price up 41% over the last 12 months.

10. 1968–1976 BMW 2002 (1974 2002 tii’s start at $26,800) – This iconic BMW remains very popular, especially on both coasts. Similar to the other German cars mentioned in this list, Hagerty Price Guide values have been especially strong for 2002s, with an 18% gain over the

Contact us today and see how we can help with your classic vehicles

Rick @insurehollis.com

 

 

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Could your nonprofit be overlooking a substantial savings opportunity?

Hollis logo groupCould your nonprofit be overlooking a substantial savings opportunity?

Massachusetts has long been a high-cost state when it comes to employer unemployment insurance. Since the latest recession, the average state unemployment tax (SUTA) cost has stayed at over $460 per employee and a single unemployment claim could potentially cost an employer upwards of $31,000. What do high SUTA and benefit amounts and wage base increases mean to your nonprofit? All these statistics mean less money for your cause.

What many nonprofit organizations don’t know is that they have options when it comes to financing their unemployment obligation to their former employees. The federal government gave nonprofits an alternative to paying the high cost of SUTA: Reimbursement Financing. This option allows nonprofits to pay dollar-for-dollar for only the unemployment claims issued to its former employees and eliminates the pooling costs found in SUTA. However, an employer self-insuring its unemployment through direct reimbursement does subject its organization to risk. Although there is a statutory limit to how much an individual claimant can collect, there is no limit to the amount in which an employer is responsible to reimburse the State. The financial impact felt by a self-insured employer that is subject to reorganization, large layoff or an unexpected loss of funding is immediate. Reimbursable employers are expected to pay back the Massachusetts Labor and Workforce Development for all unemployment claims on a monthly basis.

Nonprofits look to programs like those offered by C.L. Hollis and their trusted partner First Nonprofit Group (FNG) to take advantage of the savings that come with reimbursement financing while minimizing risk and safeguarding their budget. All FNG program members are provided with a fee that is easy to budget and is based exclusively on their own unemployment experience and employment profile. There is no shared risk or shared expenses. FNG reimburses the state directly for any and all unemployment benefits paid to former employees throughout the term. FNG’s performance is insured by their parent company, AmTrust Financial Services, Inc., rated an “A” Excellent by A.M. Best. Other program benefits include professional unemployment claims management, representation at all unemployment hearings, and cyber monitoring.

C.L. Hollis has been helping Non Profits with their Risk Management for 28 years.

Call us today for an appointment.

Richard Hollis

rick@insurehollis.com

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Non Profits overlooking a substantial savings

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Could your nonprofit be overlooking a substantial savings opportunity?

Massachusetts has long been a high-cost state when it comes to employer unemployment insurance. Since the latest recession, the average state unemployment tax (SUTA) cost has stayed at over $460 per employee and a single unemployment claim could potentially cost an employer upwards of $31,000. What do high SUTA and benefit amounts and wage base increases mean to your nonprofit? All these statistics mean less money for your cause.

What many nonprofit organizations don’t know is that they have options when it comes to financing their unemployment obligation to their former employees. The federal government gave nonprofits an alternative to paying the high cost of SUTA: Reimbursement Financing. This option allows nonprofits to pay dollar-for-dollar for only the unemployment claims issued to its former employees and eliminates the pooling costs found in SUTA. However, an employer self-insuring its unemployment through direct reimbursement does subject its organization to risk. Although there is a statutory limit to how much an individual claimant can collect, there is no limit to the amount in which an employer is responsible to reimburse the State. The financial impact felt by a self-insured employer that is subject to reorganization, large layoff or an unexpected loss of funding is immediate. Reimbursable employers are expected to pay back the Massachusetts Labor and Workforce Development for all unemployment claims on a monthly basis.

Nonprofits look to programs like those offered through C.L. Hollis to take advantage of the savings that come with reimbursement financing while minimizing risk and safeguarding their budget. All offered program members are provided with a fee that is easy to budget and is based exclusively on their own unemployment experience and employment profile. There is no shared risk or shared expenses. The program reimburses the state directly for any and all unemployment benefits paid to former employees throughout the term. This programs performance is insured by a parent company, AmTrust Financial Services, Inc., rated an “A” Excellent by A.M. Best. Other program benefits include professional unemployment claims management, representation at all unemployment hearings, and cyber monitoring.

C.L. Hollis has been helping Non Profit Companies for over 28 years; call us today so that we may help your Non Profit.

Contact rick@insurehollis.com

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Pet Injury Coverage

Dog

What is Pet Injury Coverage? C.L. Hollis Insurance

Pet Injury coverage comes complimentary with Collision coverage, and if your dog or cat is injured in an accident while riding with you, the carrier will pay up to $1000 to help with veterinary bills and medicine.

 

When Can Pet Injury Coverage Be Used?

Pet Injury coverage can be used whenever a pet is injured during a claim covered by Collision or Comprehensive coverage. This coverage is available for pets riding in the car and owned by you or your relatives.

Pet Injury coverage is built into Collision coverage – there’s no added cost if you chose to use it or not use it. Collision coverage must be included on at least one covered vehicle on the policy to receive Pet Injury coverage.

 

Coverage Highlights

  1. Coverage is limited to dogs and cats owned by the named insured and resident relatives.
  2. Only covers injuries sustained in a “collision” or “comprehensive” claim.
  3. The pet must be inside the vehicle when injured to be covered (includes pickup truck beds).
  4. $1000 is the most the carrier will pay in a collision or comp claim regardless of number of pets injured or that die.
  5. Pays up to $1000 for veterinary bills if a pet is injured in a coll/comp claim.
  6. Pays $1000 if the pet dies as a result of the coll/comp claim. The insured does not need to replace the animal to get paid.
  7. In cases of theft, we will cover a stolen pet for the $1000 death benefit only if there is a total theft of the car while the pet is in it.
  8. The customer will need to provide proof of payment to be reimbursed for vet bills.
  9. There is no coverage if there is not Collision coverage on at least one vehicle listed on the policy. If Collision coverage is purchased on any one vehicle, Pet Injury coverage is provided whether the pet is in the vehicle with collision coverage or one of the other vehicles that may not have collision on the policy, or in a “non-owned” car as defined in the policy. Furthermore, there is coverage if the pet is injured, dies or is stolen as a result of an event that fits the definitions of Comprehensive (even if Comp coverage has not been purchased).
  10. If the loss is excluded for the vehicle under Part IV of the policy, coverage for Pet Injury is also excluded.
  11. This coverage is only with selected Insurance carriers contracted with C.L. Hollis Insurance. Contact us for more information.

 

C.L. Hollis Insurance has been helping individuals and Families with their insurance solutions for 28 years. Stoughton office 781-344-8578   Wareham office 508-295-9500

Brought to you from our trusted partners Progressive Insurance

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You asked “What is a Classic”

http://insurehollis.com/antique-vehicles-insurance/

C.L. Hollis has been insuring classics for over 28 years Rick@insurehollis.com

You asked what type of vehicles will fit into our Classic Vehicle Insurance Program?

The answer is “A Picture is worth 1000 Words “Antique Cars

1980 and Newer Vehicles

Classic Military VehiclesClassic TrucksHigh Value Vehicles and CollectionsModified VehiclesMotorsports Insuranceretired commercial vehiclesVehicles Under ConstructionVintage Motorcycles and ScootersAntique Tractors

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Business Associate Agreements

C.L. Hollis has been helping businesses for over 27 years, http://www.insurehollis.com

Contract1

With the recently expanded definition of “Business Associate,” more and more technology companies even Subcontractors are being asked to sign Business Associate Agreements when working with HIPAA covered entities, always consult an Attorney first.

Here are some tips to help you navigate through the complex world of Business Associate Agreements.

  • Ensure that you have the proper insurance coverage and limits in place when assuming the risks related to Protected Health Information (PHI). Avoid assuming liability for the HIPAA covered entity’s actions
  • If you are a subcontractor, or completing only a portion of a project, be sure you limit your financial responsibility in the agreement to the work you are involved in
  • Limit indemnification agreements to the cost of the Service Level Agreement or services rendered
  • Confirm that you are not being asked to take any action that would violate HIPAA rules. If this occurs, consider a reverse indemnity agreement
  • Require other sub-contracted technology companies to sign a Business Associate Agreement, where needed, and do not allow narrower indemnification provisions than you have in your agreement. Ensure subcontractors have proper privacy and security policies in place as well as proper insurance coverage

 

  • Employee training — HIPPA requires employee privacy and security training, but training also helps minimize your risk, creates accountability, reinforces policies, and helps to ensure that the Protected Health Information is handled properly.
  • Security breach response — Despite due diligence, breaches can happen. Establishing a response plan will help you to react quickly when a breach occurs, enabling you to communicate to affected parties, as required of a Business Associate, and to minimize damages.
  • Business continuity planning — Having a business continuity plan in place helps ensure that your business can get back up and running after a disaster. And, it’s also a HIPPA Security Requirement. The Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety’s Open for Business site, (https://www.disastersafety.org/open-for-business/) offer business continuity how-to guides and planning templates.

Contact us today so that we can discuss your options!

From our trusted partners The Hanover Insurance Co

C.L. Hollis has been helping businesses for over 27 years

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Social Engineering Wire Transfer Scams

C.L. Hollis Insurance Rick@insurehollis.com

cyber2

Businesses that wire-transfer money to vendor or corporate bank accounts or on behalf of clients and customers should be aware of scams impacting even the best-managed companies. These wire-transfer scams are intentionally misleading unsuspecting employees into sending money or diverting payments to fraudsters who are impersonating vendors, clients, customers and even senior executives or business owners.

Here are some typical scams and strategies to avoid them:

Business Email Compromise

This popular scam begins with a fraudulent email sent from someone pretending to be the company’s vendor, customer, or client — or someone posing as an owner, senior executive, or employee. The email will request a transfer of funds and will trick the company employee into wiring funds to a specific bank account under the control of the fraudster.

The Purported Vendor Scheme

In scams involving purported vendors, the criminal assumes the identity of a company vendor and uses an email that appears to be legitimate — often from a compromised email account or by using a similar but slightly altered domain name. The email will be sent to an employee who the fraudster knows is in a position to transfer money. The email identifies themselves as a valid vendor the company partners with, and advises the employee that they have changed bank accounts and to send the next few payments to the new bank. The email will look authentic and may include the vendor’s logo or an attached letter with the vendor’s letterhead. In cases where the perpetrator may have previously breached the company’s computer network, the email may even point to a few valid transactions between the company and vendor. The employee, without authenticating or validating the request, will proceed with wire transferring the money to the requested bank. As soon as the money is received by the new bank, the funds are quickly transferred out to an overseas bank well before the company realizes they have been scammed, which usually occurs when the real vendor begins asking for the overdue payment.

The Purported Business Owner/ Sr. Executive Scheme

In this type of scam, the perpetrators will identify themselves within an email as the company owner or senior executive, and will state that they need a transfer made to the bank account identified in the email as soon as possible — common reasons include “to fund a recent acquisition” or for “tax purposes.” The email will target an employee, or even another senior executive, who is in a position to transfer money. The email will have a sense of urgency to it. In some cases, the email will state that there will be a follow up call shortly from an attorney who will provide all of the transaction details and banking information. Shortly thereafter, the call will come in to the employee from the purported attorney. The employee will proceed to wire transfer the money to the requested bank without authenticating the request. The money is then quickly transferred by the fraudster to an overseas bank well before the company realizes they have been scammed.

As these types of scams evolve and become more complex, companies should make it a priority to include fraud prevention as a part of their regular business practice processes, utilizing authentication practices, third-party testing when possible, and following all applicable cyber security standards.

What To Do If Faced With A False Pretense/ Social Engineering Wire Fraud Scam

When a company realizes it is the victim of a wire transfer fraud scam, it is important to act immediately and call the financial institutions involved in the transaction. The local police and the FBI should also be contacted. Companies can submit all relevant information to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) at http://www.ic3.gov

Ask us about “False Pretense Insurance Coverage”

From our trusted partners the Hanover Insurance Group

C.L. Hollis Insurance wwwinsurehollis.com  

Stoughton Office 781.344.8578

Wareham Office 508.295.9500

Rick Hollis rick@insurehollis.com

 

 

 

 

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